Where have we been, where are we now, and where are we going with respect to teaching and learning in classrooms across the United States in the 21st Century? Do we want to just use technology to do traditional education more efficiently, or do we want to do education differently and better? In this presentation I advocate for the constructive use of disruptive technologies, like blogs, wikis, and podcasts, to help engage students in the development of literacy skills with an authentic audience. Several fantasies about learning which many people have today (including many legislators) are addressed, and prescriptions for where we should go next in the 21st century with curriculum and instruction are suggested. The podcast also includes a short presentation by teachers from Carrollton-Farmers Branch ISD about a very successful podcasting initiative in their school district this year.

Program Length: 1 hour, 13 min, 34 sec
File size: 17.7 MB

Podcast-c 28 Feb 2006(Click here to listen to this podcast)

Show notes for this podcast include:

  1. Robert Frost: The Road Not Taken
  2. Science Education in the 21st Century: Using the Tools of Science to Teach Science by Dr. Carl Wieman
  3. Our brainstormed words for traditional teaching and learning
  4. Well-structured versus ill-structured problem solving by Dr. David Jonassen
  5. The New Literacies: Essential or Enrichment? by David Jakes
  6. Cultivating Digital Literacy Through Blogging and Podcasting
  7. Feedblitz: Receive RSS updates via email
  8. WikiPedia Size Comparisons
  9. Internet encyclopaedias go head to head (WikiPedia)
  10. Wikipedia
  11. Flickr
  12. “Digital Natives, Digital Immigrants” Marc Prensky (PDF)
  13. Levels of Technology Implementation (LoTi)
  14. Synching Up With The iKid (Edutopia Magazine October 2005)
  15. “The World Is Flat: A Brief History of the Twenty-first Century” by Thomas L. Friedman
  16. “A Whole New Mind: Moving from the Information Age to the Conceptual Age” by Daniel Pink
  17. “Are We Losing Our Edge?” TIME Magazine Cover Story, 13 Feb 2006
  18. Rising Above the Gathering Storm: Energizing and Employing America for a Brighter Economic Future
  19. MySpace and Xanga
  20. Skype
  21. High-Stakes Testing and Student Achievement: Does Accountability Pressure Increase Student Learning? by Nichols, Glass and Berliner
  22. ePals Classroom Exchange
  23. Email Improving Student Reading and Writing Test Scores
  24. Bubbleshare
  25. Carrollton-Farmers Branch ISD district podcast (XML link)
  26. “John Dewey and the Art of Teaching: Toward Reflective and Imaginative Practice” by Douglas J. Simpson, Michael J. B. Jackson, Judy C. Aycock
  27. Mabry Middle School Podcasts (Cobb County, Georgia)

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