I have written a new article for the winter edition of the TechEdge, the journal of the Texas Computer Education Association. Normally I publish these articles on my “Tools for the TEKS” website, but since my version of Dreamweaver no longer works with my upgraded operating system I have to delay linking this article from that site. My latest article is titled “Mobile Digital Storytelling” and is available as a PDF file. The opening descriptive paragraph reads:

In the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, most students and teachers in schools were sharply limited in the potential audience for which they could share their ideas and publications. Gone are the days when the top destination for exemplary student work was the family refrigerator. The potential audience for student work has changed dramatically in the 21st century with the advent of read/write web (web 2.0) tools like blogs, wikis, social networking websites, and video publication venues like YouTube. The ability for anyone with access to a web browser to publish text, audio, and video on the global stage of the Internet is a disruptive, challenging, and empowering phenomenon. In the context of digital storytelling, a variety of tools are available which permit learners of all ages to constructively share their voices and perspectives via the Internet using free website tools, readily available technologies like cell phones, and relatively affordable commercial hardware tools like portable audio recorders. This article explores several options for mobile digital storytelling.

If you have feedback or comments about the ideas in this article, I would welcome them as comments to this post. If you haven’t already, do not “Pass Go or Collect $200” before listening to Liz Kolb’s outstanding K12Online07 presentation “Cell Phones as Classroom Learning Tools” which I reference in this article. Also be sure to check out her blog “From Toy to Tool: Cell Phones in Schools.”

Aside: Since I’m not eager to pony up several hundred dollars for an updated version of Dreamweaver I’m considering the much more reasonably priced RapidWeaver software. If Rapidweaver supports CSS and the other website features I have currently incorporated in my Tools for the TEKS site, I will likely stop being a DW user altogether. I have wanted to transition my entire site to a CMS like Joomla, but have not made time to do that yet… perhaps over the holidays…

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2 Responses to Mobile Digital Storytelling

  1. Liz Kolb says:

    Wes
    Congrats on the excellent article! Thank you for the reference too! We need more articles on this topic and about creative ways to take advantage of these tools.

  2. […] I still need to add titles, links and dates for my presentations from 2007. I resolved the dilemma I blogged about in November regarding Dreamweaver by running the program in Windows XP via Parallels. As a result, I am not having to make wholesale […]

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