One of our “Celebrate Oklahoma Voices” digital storytelling project participants asked a good question today on our learning community forum:

Does anyone have any suggestions for websites to safely download pictures off the internet?

This was my answer.

Julie:

Great question.

Flickr Creative Commons is one of the best and one we recommend in our COV workshops, as you know. I recommend using the Attribution-Only licensed images.

WikiPedia is a good source for images because all the sharing/use terms are explicitly listed for images. We have other image sources listed on our Image Resources page of our COV project Google Site.

The wiki site “Copyright-Friendly and Copyleft Images and Sound (Mostly!) for Use in Media Projects and Web Pages, Blogs, Wikis, etc.” also has an extensive list worth checking out.

David Warlick has an extensive but perhaps overwhelming list of websites which can be used as image sources on his Landmarks for Schools site.

I used to teach a workshop titled “Multimedia Madness: Obtaining Images, Movies, and Audio Files from the Internet and CD-ROMs,” and although the list is a a bit dated there are some image sources there that could be helpful.

Cathy Nelson’s October 2008 post on Classroom 2.0 “Copyright Friendly Pictures” has a bunch of additional suggestions.

What would you say in response?

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  • http://heyjude.wordpress.com/ Judy O’Connell

    I get asked this a lot, specially when I was doing PD sessions with teachers. It’s why I put together a collection on my blog to point teachers too, after having discussing the options (and restrictions) in their schools. Teachers have to find ways to show kids good habits, and good sources for images. My all time favourite remains FlickrCC! Check the link to my collection at http://heyjude.wordpress.com/find-free-images-online/

  • Gary s. Stager

    I’m surprised you didn’t mention the original site by kids and teachers for kids and teachers, http://pics4learning.com

  • Christine Davis

    Thank you for the links to copyright-friendly resources. As an Online Course Developer and Art Teacher, I am always searching for multimedia resources.

    Please add this one to your repertoire. It is simply a wiki that a few colleagues and I have started in an attempt to put these resources at our fingertips.

    http://digitalmediaresources.wikispaces.com/

    Thanks,
    Christine Davis
    Art Teacher
    Troy Middle School
    Troy, PA

  • http://aboatman.blogspot.com Andy

    Good Morning,
    Picasa is offering CC licensing as well on their Web Albums. Information can be found at http://googlephotos.blogspot.com/2008/09/sharing-photos-with-creative-commons.html
    I will try to remember to discuss this during my Picasa presentation at the OTA conference.
    Thanks,
    Andy

  • http://blog.mrjwilliams.com J.D. Williams

    I’d suggest adding http://flickrcc.bluemountains.net/ All it does is search Flickr for CC images, but personally I like how it is laid out and that it gives me the attribution text easily.

  • http://profiles.google.com/bogdannmares Bogdan Nicolae Mares

    Thanks for the list, great items.
    You might also want to check this new site for royalty free pictures:
    http://www.picdrome.com.

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