Today I shared a seven minute “Pecha Kutcha” presentation with my “Technology 4 Teachers” students on the topic, “What I hope you learned this semester in our class.” I recorded the audio with my Sony UX-71 digital audio recorder and uploaded / synchronized that mp3 file to my slides on SlideShare this evening:

A “Pecha Kutcha” presentation typically includes twenty slides, and the presenter has twenty seconds per slide to share a story or discuss a topic related to that image. For their final presentation projects, my students are creating their own Pecha Kutcha presentations about topics they self-select. This has proven to be a GREAT activity to focus on digital literacy, good websites for obtaining copyright-friendly / Creative Commons images (like Compfight and FlickrStorm) as well as work on our oral presentation skills. Lots of creativity shown by my students this week in their presentations! These were the topics I addressed in my pecha kutcha:

1. high expectations / dreaming big
2. digital learning
3. blogging (individual and team)
4. hyperlinked writing
5. embed media (images, videos, Google Docs, VoiceThread)
6. geo-apps (Google Maps)
7. wikis (Google Site)
8. online surveys (with SMS, Poll Everywhere, Google forms)
9. screencasting
10. Digital newspapers
11. Microblogging (Twitter)
12. Value of content creation (new Bloom’s)
13. Value of sharing (Diigo, Twitter, open web publishing)
14. Value of backchannels
15. Value of PBL
16. Value of online video
17. Power of visual images (VoiceThread, Pecha Kutcha and Presentation Zen)
18. copyright understanding and respect
19. Importance of co-learning and failure
20. Importance of making a difference!

The complete curriculum for our “Technology 4 Teachers” course is available online in a Google site.

Learn more about pecha kutcha presentations from the English WikiPedia and by viewing examples from pecha-kutcha.org.

Our focus on utilizing “full-bleed” / full screen images during presentations and eliminating text entirely from our PowerPoint / Google Presentation slideshows seemed particularly appropriate today, following Monday’s article in the New York Times, “We Have Met the Enemy and He Is PowerPoint.” I highly recommend Garr Reynold’s book, “Presentation Zen: Simple Ideas on Presentation Design and Delivery” for great ideas along these lines for improving the media presentations you and your students share with others.

H/T to Berlin Fang for sharing the link to that NYT article.

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  • Hi there,

    Thank you for your ost and ideas. I’m not a savvy teacher, but i’ve been working on it. I follow your blog an I added it to an initiative called . It’s worth keeping an eye on this blog. I hope it’s ok with you…

  • Of course that’s fine, I’m honored to be included on your blogroll.

    You appear quite tech saavy to me, most teachers don’t have their own professional blog. 🙂 Thanks for sharing ideas.

  • John Weidner

    If you teach tech to teachers again could you teach them about shared calendars (if you don’t already.) I can display a calendar on my phone that merges together several public calendars. If teachers would add the dates of tests or when projects are due to a class calendar, then I could keep up with what my kids need to be working on much better.

  • I love this! What a great idea for a class project! I was assigned this blog several weeks ago to comment on regularly then leave a summary of what I’ve gotten from your blog on my own personal blog. This was an assignment from Dr. Strange in my EDM 310 class at the University of South Alabama.

  • JJ

    I have followed with interest your T4T class this semester as you shared much of your course outline and what you required of your students. I am hoping you and others will continue to prepare teachers for using technology in the classroom. One might think that our newer teachers are coming into the profession armed with up-to-date technology training, but that is not yet happening. This course is precisely what I wish all of our teachers were getting from their undergraduate preparation.

  • Thanks JJ. I certainly hope to continue on this path of pre-service and in-service teacher preparation / professional development for technology integration. I agree this is a dire need. I’ve enjoyed teaching this semester, but it’s been an eye opener for me on several fronts. The need to redefine “digital literacy” and “technology fluency” is apparent not only within our schools but also our hallowed halls of academia. I’m hopeful I’ll again have a chance to teach a couple sections of this T4T class in the fall.

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