These are my notes from Karen Fasimpaur’s session, “Open Educational Resources: Share, Remix, Learn” at the 2011 ISTE conference. Resources from Karen’s session are on http://www.k12opened.com/wiki/index.php/Iste2011.

Creative Commons has had a HUGE impact on the work I do, helping teachers accomplish their learning objectives with students

I believe:
- differentiating instruction is essential to improving education
- textbooks are not good tools for differentiation (traditional textbooks)
- technology coupled with high quality content is great for differentiation
- teachers and students need high quality resources they can use to LEGALLY build interactive lessons, podcasts, multimedia presentations, etc.
- sharing is good

website freereading.net example
- lots of decodable passage examples, but they are all PDFs
- we thought it would be great for these reading passages to be in more interactive mediums
- We took these PDFs and put them into Voicethread

Because those materials were openly licensed, we could do this legally
- many materials states purchase as curriculum do NOT give permission for teachers and others to repurpose their content on a public website

OER is relevant to education:
- because it creates content suitable for ‘remixing’ for differentiation
- it increases equity
- it’s FREE
- it models 21st century skills (copyright)
- represents a wise use of public funds

I see so many examples in schools of everyone right clicking Google images and putting them everywhere / publishing them everywhere
- we need more conversations about copyright

Kids are very interested in copyright sessions because they view themselves as content producer

When you purchase something or make something that is openly licensed, then everyone can benefit from it

99% of everything on the Internet IS copyrighted
- there is a continuum of copyright

fair use is quite a bit narrower than most teachers think it is
- it applies in your classroom

ACTUALLY, THE TEACH ACT IS SPECIFIC TO INSTRUCTIONAL SETTINGS BUT FAIR USE IS NOT SPECIFIC TO EDUCATION, THERE IS A PROVISION FOR NON-COMMERCIAL USE

With public domain works, you don’t even have to cite the source

Avoid the ND (no derivatives) license because it prohibits remixing

Other licenses in addition to Creative Commons
- GFDL
- Public Domain
- Custom licenses

Citing sources is a LEGAL requirement for Creative Commons works
- always cite sources
- credit the person who owns the copyright, not necessarily the website
- sometimes I see “credit: Creative Commons” or “credit: Google” but that doesn’t cut it
- screen names are ok for attribution credit
- it’s optional but a good idea to include the source URL where an image came from (that is very useful to go back and investigate things)

THIS SESSION MAKES ME THINK WE REALLY SHOULD DEVELOP SOME TOOLS TO ASSIST IN MEDIA ATTRIBUTION FOR STORYCHASERS PROJECTS (AND OPENLY LICENSE THEM, OF COURSE!)

Hands on part:
- think of a unit of student or standard as you research, evaluate, and collect OERs to use in that unit
- think about building a “media set”

With OER you can put the resources legally on your OWN site

Great idea I’m really enthused about: creating media sets of resource materials aligned to curriculum
- Example: The Human Body media set
- on our site, when you right click images and get properties we embed license terms with

If everyone creates openly licensed materials like these tied to curriculum and standards, we’ll be overflowing with them

I suggest sharing these on Curriki with a the tag “mediaset”

Definitely avoid everything that is shared under a ‘no derivatives’ license

I love Livebinders
- it is SUCH A great tool and resource
- lets you make a digital binder of information
- if you use lots of tabs, you create a digital binder with different tabs

Here’s my example:

THIS IS A GREAT GREAT COLLECTION OF RESOURCES FROM KAREN OF OER RESOURCES ON LIVEBINDER

Flickr is the BEST resource I’ve seen for openly licensed images
- advanced search in Flickr is best way to get to Flickr CC images
- check boxes to ONLY search CC and find content to remix:

Flickr: Advanced Search

Wikimedia Commons is another great resource
- many people have gone into the Library of Congress and better organized their content, pulled high quality elements, etc and put it in the Wikimedia Commons

WP Clip Art is my favorite free clip art site

CC Mixter is site where all the music came from I was playing initially
- good for contemporary music, kids tend to like it

ANOTHER SITE ON CCMIXTER WHICH I JUST SAW IS ccMixter Music Discovery, LOOKS LIKE A GREAT SITE FOR FINDING OPENLY LICENSED MUSIC FOR DIFFERENT KINDS OF PROJECTS

http://www.freesound.org great

Teacher’s Domain is best site for video, this is PBS video
- traditional PBS content is traditionally licensed
- this site, however, has a subset of video broken into clips that is openly licensed

Research on differentiated instruction says you need to chunk content, break into pieces, ideally all videos are less than 5 minutes

I’m very passionate about this project: Kids Open Dictionary
- kid friendly language AND openly licensed
- enter your words and it will create a glossary for you, it will create flashcards too!

Literacy 360 is GREAT

Math is richest area for OER right now
- lots of people know about Kahn Academy, but views are all over about it
- I think differentiation is about having a big menu of choices
- for some kids Kahn’s content will work great, but not for everyone (over 2100 videos available)
- he is starting to do
- Kahn academy also hosted
- also have “Kahn on a stick” so you can download lots of the videos easily

Mathispower4u tutorials from James Sousa, originally designed as a Community College resource
- a lot of this kind of community college stuff is high school remediation
- there are thousands of math tutorial videos

Karl Fisch’s algebra videos are excellent, structured in a pedagogically appealing way (different from Kahn’s more informal style)

Interactive simulations from UC Boulder are phenomenal: science, physics
http://phet.colorado.edu/

K12 Open Ed eBooks: available for web, kindle and EPUB
- geared toward elementary and middle school (most other ebooks out there openly licensed are more high school oriented)

I think the biggest thing which reforms K12 education are using online materials
- there is going to be a big teacher shortage down the road
- in Detroit now they have 60 kids in some classrooms

New project from the Open High School of Utah: Open Courseware!
- 1st example of all online school, all courses openly licensed
- can download the Moodle packages too!

As many of us continue to openly license high quality educational materials, we are going to take away the potential market for commercial publishers / curriculum materials

I am working on some openly licensed PD projects via http://p2pu.org, contact me if you’re interested in participating in a pilot project

I’M WONDERING HOW THE K-12 ONLINE CONFERENCE COULD BE A PART OF THAT

Share as much as you can and feel comfortable with
- set your Flickr default license to CC BY
- use open platforms like WikiSpaces which have a default open license, and/or put a default open license on your stuff

If you are interested about this, tell other people about it!

A SESSION PARTICIPANT RECOMMENDED ZOTERO AS A RESEARCH TOOL

PHPMotion video/media library from Karen’s group: media.k12opened.com

Participant just mentioned www.oerglue.com in beta, subscription source, lets you import OER resources #iste11


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