In June 2013 at the International Society for Technology in Education (ISTE) conference in San Antonio, I had an opportunity to share a short “Ignite” presentation during the opening session. An Ignite presentation typically includes 20 slides which auto-advance every 15 seconds, so each presentation is five minutes long. (I used less than 20 slides in my ISTE13 Ignite, so my presentation was a little shorter.) Here is the 4 minute, 40 second video recording of my ISTE 2013 Ignite talk, which was titled, “Open Doors for Students.”

This is the proposal I emailed to ISTE when I applied to share this Ignite talk:

I’d like to share three ideas which can open big, important doors for students in your community. They are: Make an eBook with a Child, Lead a Scratch Camp, and Start a Storychaser Club. Creating an eBook with a child can help them learn “your word is your wand.” Students can discover their voice and the responsibility which comes with communication power. By leading a local Scratch camp, you can help kids learn to use a FREE program to create games, tell stories, make animations, and practice computational thinking as well as problem solving in ways they may have never experienced in the classroom. Students can connect with a worldwide, collaborative learning community which can both inspire and support them. Playing with Scratch gives adults opportunities to experience being “a beginner” again. Our kids face this every day. We need to be brave learners and embrace both creativity and possibility. Scratch lets us do this in transformative ways. The enthusiasm of young Scratchers is unavoidably contagious. Storychaser Clubs are after-school opportunities for students to learn the skills and ethics of being new-media journalists in their community. Digital citizenship is best learned as a verb rather than a noun and an adjective. By learning to create and share hyperlinked text, images, audio interviews and quick-edit videos, student Storychasers can not only amplify wonderful things happening in your school but also open the door for students to model twenty-first century literacy for everyone in your community.

This video is an excerpt of a longer 1.5 hour video posted by ISTE to YouTube. My presentation starts at 43:14. I created the previous “time-specific” YouTube link using YouTubetime.com. I recorded a 5.5 minute screencast today demonstrating how I created this shorter video and posted it to YouTube with the title, “Quickly save an excerpt of a longer YouTube video.”

Here are some referenced links of interest from this presentation:

  1. More resources about making multimedia eBooks with kids are available on:
    http://wiki.wesfryer.com/Home/handouts/ebooks
  2. Information and resources about Scratch software is on:
    http://wiki.wesfryer.com/Home/handouts/scratch
  3. Information about starting a student Storychaser / journalism club at school is on:
    http://storychasers.org/clubs/

My presentation slides are also available on SlideShare, with a practice audio recording I rehearsed at the June 2013 iPad Media Camp in Oklahoma City.

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  • morgan rushlow

    I thought this post was very interesting. I do think technology certainly does open the doors for students to create in a way that had been impossible before. I believe technology is an important part of the learning process for students. The question to ask, however, is why is technology not being used in every classroom?

    here’s the link to my edm 310 student blog-http://rushlowmorganedm310.blogspot.com

    and my twitter page-https://twitter.com/morganrrushlow

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