Update 2/13/2014: An audio podcast recording of this presentation is available on “Fuel for Educational Change Agents.”

These are the slides for a presentation I’m sharing Wednesday evening titled “Managing Digital Footprints – for grandparents.” This is the description I added to the slides in SlideShare:

This is a presentation shared by Dr. Wesley Fryer on March 12, 2014, at Church of the Resurrection in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma. The presentation explored what “digital footprints” are, why it’s important for parents and grandparents to have regular conversations with young people about their digital footprints, how many misconceptions abound concerning teen use of social media, and what we can do to manage our digital footprints constructively.

I’m quoting extensively from danah boyd’s February 2014 book, “It’s Complicated: the social lives of networked teens.” It’s an outstanding book I highly recommend.

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On this day..

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  • Mapnmop

    It looks like you are introducing to an older, perhaps more reluctant to view with any fondness the increased technology use of their grandchildren, etc., generation to the reality of technology, and it’s permanent presence and important role in the lives of our youth today. Rather than being scared or too nostalgic (making them bitter towards this change), it would behoove them to see that through technology their grandchildren are able to connect and create and do many amazing things. It looks like you are trying to ease the trepidations and offer another opportunity for an older generation to reconnect with the younger generation, embracing this reality with them. Am I correct here? If so, how was your message received?

  • http://www.speedofcreativity.org Wesley Fryer

    I think the presentation was well received. I recorded it and will post it soon to http://audio.speedofcreativity.org – I also may add it to the slideshare for a “slidecast.” The audience ended up being more mixed than I anticipated, there were about 12 teens from their youth group there, as well as a good number of middle aged folks. Lots of older people too though, 2 of the people sitting in the front row were in their 80s! Hopefully they heard a message about living in a time of big changes, and the importance of regularly communicating with each other to learn alongside one another… and also be accountable to each other.

  • Mapnmop

    Good deal. I hadn’t thought of teaching the parents/grandparents of the importance of technology before. My mindset has always been more of how to use technology with my first graders. This was a rather mind stretching idea/post that I enjoyed seeing. I’m glad to know it was well received. Thanks for letting me know. :)

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